By Kathy Kuhl

[Note below about last week’s prize winners.]

Who isn’t distracted this time of year? Lovely ornaments, music, delicious foods—but more to do, too.

It’s an especially tough time for our children and teens who are distractible or who have sensory processing difficulties: the intensity can be overwhelming. When he was small, my distractible son was so frustrated by seeing presents under the tree that we had to wait until Christmas Eve to set any out.

Nothing under the tree is okay with me. Do what works for you and your family.

To help your distracted child through the holidays:

These Wacky Tracks are also fun to fiddle with:

Here are some other ways to get the wiggles out. Balance boards such as this:

Using a slackline builds strength your core, improves balance, and is fun. I want to try one:

(There are more tools for out-of-the-box, distractible learners at my online store.)

Enjoy a chat & a cuppa.

Make time to sit and breathe.

The holidays are also tough for parents who are distractible or have sensory processing issues themselves. So try to relax, enjoy, and give thanks. As one mom told me when I interviewed her for Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner:

“Sometimes Mom is the one who needs the time out.” 

So take care of yourself.

One Christmas I had bronchitis. All I could do was on the sofa. I didn’t write cards, I didn’t bake cookies, I didn’t decorate the tree, I didn’t cook a feast. We skipped many things we usually do, and my kids and husband did some great work. We had a good Christmas.

It really is okay to have carryout pizza for your holiday meal, or leftovers, or whatever you want. Choose what you’re going to be busy about, and enjoy what you can.

Curl up with a cup of tea and a good book.

Speaking of books, congratulations to Megan, Chris, and Jennifer, who won copies of my books. Thanks to everyone who completed the survey.

Happy Christmas!